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Batulabude, Andereya
d. 1935
Church of Uganda (Anglican) / African Orthodox Church
Uganda

 

[Bukedi, Muganda]
Rev. Andereya Batulabude was originally a slave from Buvuma who became a client of Semei Kakungulu when the latter was kimbugwe. He continued as his follower in Bugerere.[1] In 1901 he was ordained deacon.[2] He pioneered the work in Bugwere at Nabowa, and then went with Kakungulu to Budaka, and in 1904 to Mbale.[3] From 1904-1908 he was at Kumi where he worked in close cooperation with Isaka Nsige the saza chief, and where he baptized a few Iteso, but most of his work was among the Baganda.[4] In 1906 he moved to Ngora when the mission was opened there.[5] In 1911 he was ordained priest. In 1929 he was unfrocked, women being his undoing.[6] He later joined the African Orthodox Church started by Reuben Spartas, but was dismissed after only a year. He later asked to be readmitted to the Anglican Church. He died in 1935.[7]

Louise Pirouet


Notes (short form; see List of Sources for complete citations):

  1. Dr. N. Twaddle, personal communication
  2. Church of Uganda, Record Book.
  3. Kagwa, 1965.
  4. See Chapter VI, pp. 331-2 [of the PhD thesis by Pirouet listed below]
  5. Church of Uganda, Record Book.
  6. Church of Uganda, Record Book; Kagwa, 1965.
  7. Welbourn, 1961, pp. 109-110.


This biography, written by Louise Pirouet, was included in “Appendix A: Biographical Notes,” on page 373 of “The Expansion of the Church of Uganda (N.A.C.) from Buganda into Northern and Western Uganda between 1891 and 1914, with Special Reference to the work of African Teachers and Evangelists” (PhD Thesis: University of East Africa, 1968). Pirouet published this thesis as Black Evangelists (London: Rex Collings, 1978). However, Black Evangelists does not reproduce the detailed biographies, complete with references to sources, found in Appendix A of the thesis. Print copies are available at Africana Section, Makerere University Library (U 02 P57); The Centre for Christianity Worldwide, Cambridge; and a microfilm copy at the School of Oriental Studies, London. [information from Angus Crichton]