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Byabusakuzi, Paulo
19th and 20th centuries
Church of Uganda (Anglican)
Uganda

 

[TORO]
Paulo Byabusakuzi was born at Katwe, Busongora. When Lugard passed through in 1891 he was taken from his parents by one of Lugard’s followers and brought to Butanuka. Later he was sold to a man called Mufumu. He first started to receive Christian instruction at Butanuka from a teacher called Enoka Wanjara, where the chief was Yosua Lusoke, katikiro until 1897 or 1899. He was baptized in July 1900 and confirmed the same year. In 1901 he became a teacher and was sent to Bubandi with a Muganda, but the Muganda did not stay long, and he was left to carry on alone. In 1902 he returned to Kabarole and did some training under the Rev. Apolo Kivebulaya, and later worked with Kivebulaya for a year in Buruli. In 1906 he married Sofu Kihangwa, also a trained teacher. He did his first letter in 1907 and his second letter in 1913, and after this, went to Ankole for a year. From 1918 onwards he taught at Kabarole for several years, and later did his third letter at Mukono, but was not considered suitable for ordination, largely because of his age. In 1966 he was still teaching at Kamengo near Kabarole. He is the father of the late Timothy Bazurbaza.

Louise Pirouet


Notes (short form; see List of Sources for complete citations):

Based on his own information, and checked with church registers.


This biography, written by Louise Pirouet, was included in “Appendix A: Biographical Notes,” on page 380 of “The Expansion of the Church of Uganda (N.A.C.) from Buganda into Northern and Western Uganda between 1891 and 1914, with Special Reference to the work of African Teachers and Evangelists” (PhD Thesis: University of East Africa, 1968). Pirouet published this thesis as Black Evangelists (London: Rex Collings, 1978). However, Black Evangelists does not reproduce the detailed biographies, complete with references to sources, found in Appendix A of the thesis. Print copies are available at Africana Section, Makerere University Library (U 02 P57); The Centre for Christianity Worldwide, Cambridge; and a microfilm copy at the School of Oriental Studies, London. [information from Angus Crichton]