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Kaboha, Leo  
c. 1860 to 1937 
Catholic
Uganda

 

[TORO and BUNYORO, Clan: Baitara]
Leo Kaboha was born in Mwenge. His father died when he was very young at a time when the country was suffering from a smallpox epidemic and from cattle disease, so the family moved to Bunyoro where the sickness was less severe. As a young man he stayed around the court, and joined in some of Kabarega’s campaigns, making himself a name for reliance and leadership. He was made a sub-chief, and he remained in this position until 1905 when he was made a saza chief, Kimbugwe of Buruli. He was baptized as a Catholic about 1901. Because of his involvement in the Nyangire rising against the Baganda chiefs in 1907 he was deprived of his chieftaincy and sent back to Mwenge, now in Toro. He then received a chieftaincy around the Salt Lake at Katwe, and was later appointed saza chief of Kitagweta with his headquarters a Matiri in what is now Kyaka. Throughout Kabarega’s lifetime he continued loyal to him, and would never let him be mentioned except respectfully by his title in his household. He was very thorough in all he did, and a staunch Catholic. He had a chapel in his homestead and everyone had to attend daily prayers at 6.00 AM. He died of pneumonia in 1937, and two years later his son, Mako Kaboha, became katikiro of Toro.

Louise Pirouet


Notes (short form; see List of Sources for complete citations):

Based on information given by his grandson, Faneras Kaboha.


This biography, written by Louise Pirouet, was included in “Appendix A: Biographical Notes,” on page 393 of “The Expansion of the Church of Uganda (N.A.C.) from Buganda into Northern and Western Uganda between 1891 and 1914, with Special Reference to the work of African Teachers and Evangelists” (PhD Thesis: University of East Africa, 1968). Pirouet published this thesis as Black Evangelists (London: Rex Collings, 1978). However, Black Evangelists does not reproduce the detailed biographies, complete with references to sources, found in Appendix A of the thesis. Print copies are available at Africana Section, Makerere University Library (U 02 P57); The Centre for Christianity Worldwide, Cambridge; and a microfilm copy at the School of Oriental Studies, London. [information from Angus Crichton]